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onv:the_impact_and_legacy_of_otaku_no_video [2015/11/28 04:06]
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onv:the_impact_and_legacy_of_otaku_no_video [2016/10/04 14:00] (current)
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 ===== The spread of the word '​otaku'​ in America ===== ===== The spread of the word '​otaku'​ in America =====
  
-If you look at how often '​otaku'​ was used in English-language Usenet posts in the early 1990s, you'll see that relatively few people used the term prior to the 1993 North American ​release of Otaku no Video. After Otaku no Video was released, the word 'otaku' ​exploded in popularity. Takeda Yasuhiro wrote in 2002, "In the US, this OVA is widely regarded as the otaku bible."​+An examination of English-language Usenet posts from the early 1990s shows that the term "​otaku"​ was relatively unused ​prior to 1993. After the release of Otaku no Video, the term "otaku" ​exploded in popularity. Takeda Yasuhiro wrote in 2002, "In the US, this OVA [Otaku no Video] ​is widely regarded as the otaku bible."​
  
-While it may not have become ​part of mainstream ​American speech, the term 'otaku' ​is certainly ​well-known and highly ​used among fans of anime and manga in the United States and other countries. The spread of 'otaku' ​among English speakers, sparked by Otaku no Video, ​also coincided with the meteoric ​growth of anime fandom ​on the World Wide Web and the spread of anime conventions around the world.+While it may not be a part of the mainstream ​lexicon, the term "otaku" ​is well-known and frequently ​used among American ​anime fans, as well as fans in other western ​countries. The spread of the word "otaku" ​among English speakers also coincided with the drastic ​growth of anime fandom ​across ​the World Wide Web, as well as the spread of anime conventions around the world.
  
-On a related note, Gainax's first OAV series Aim for the Top! Gunbuster contains what might be the first usage of the word '​otaku'​ within anime -- in which '​otaku'​ is used to refer to a knowledgeable anime/SFX fan. Gunbuster also happens to be one of the first three subtitled anime sold in the United States, along with Dangaio ​and Metal Skin Panic MADOX-01 ​(released by Animeigo).+On a related note, the Gainax ​OVA series Aim for the Top! Gunbuster contains what might be the first usage of the term '​otaku'​ within anime – in which '​otaku'​ is used to refer to a knowledgeable anime/SFX fan. Gunbuster ​is also one of the first three subtitled anime properties ​sold in the United States, along with Dangaioh ​and Metal Skin Panic MADOX-01.
  
 +On an unrelated note, Metal Skin Panic MADOX-01 is AnimEigo’s first commercial release in North America.
 ===== Previous releases of Otaku no Video ===== ===== Previous releases of Otaku no Video =====